2Jan/180

American Classics – Smith & Wesson Revolvers

Smith & Wesson American Revolvers

Sometimes it takes some good old-fashioned American ingenuity to create an icon: Horace Smith and Daniel B. Wesson are two prime examples of that statement. These two New Englanders formed a partnership in 1852 with the goal of creating a lever-action repeating pistol that utilized a self-contained cartridge. Financial difficulties would plague the company during its early years, forcing the partners to sell the company to another little-known manufacturer called Oliver Winchester.

The partners would not be deterred by their initial setback, and in 1856 Smith & Wesson would again produce a revolver aimed at firing the Rimfire cartridge they had manufactured in 1854. It was the first of its kind to fire fully self-contained cartridges. A patent would buy Smith & Wesson a few years to improve their product, leading to the creation of the Model 3 American. The original large caliber cartridge revolver, the Model 3 had two big market clients: the United States government and Russia.

Smith & Wesson thrived for decades, until Horace Smith retired at the age of 65. D.B. Wesson, now the sole owner of the organization, would continue the work he and his partner had started. In the late 1800s, he introduced a line of hammerless revolvers. Most notably, however, was the following Smith & Wesson introduction: the Model 10. The Model 10, or .38 Military & Police, has been in continuous production since it was first introduced.

The 20th Century would also see some iconic revolvers introduced, including the .357 Magnum. From there, S & W would manufacturer the Model 39, the first American-made double action auto-loading pistol.

Smith & Wesson Revolvers Today

The company has undergone some changes over the decades, but they still hold try to their core values and ideals. Many of the Smith & Wesson firearm models from the 20th century can still be found for sale today, though in an updated version of their predecessors. That timeless aspect of the brand has caused gun stores and online gun stores to continue to carry a vast inventory of the Smith & Wesson brand. Let’s take a look at some of the favorites you might find when looking for revolvers for sale.

Smith & Wesson 10 Blued .38 Special

One of the longest running models in production, the Model 10 is a true classic. It is as much a part of firearm history as it is American history. The wooden grip and steel frame symbolize how far the revolver has come and how yesterday’s materials are still some of the best options for today’s firearms. If the past is an indication, the Model 10 will continue to be produced for decades to come.

Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum

Another revolver that has withstood the test of time is the .357 Magnum. This is their Model 586, a single/double action medium-sized revolver. Like many other S & W’s, it retains the wooden grip that many collectors are looking for. Six rounds are ready to be fired out of the 4-inch barrel at the touch of a trigger. The modern version is every bit as fierce as its earlier renditions.

Smith & Wesson Model 29 .44 Magnum

When people see this firearm, it often evokes memories of Clint Eastwood in Dirty Harry. There is a reason this firearm strikes fear into people, and it is not just from that iconic movie. Today, it features a 6.5-inch barrel, carbon frame, and a double action. It’s hard to find a revolver you will like more. The Model 29 is a true stand-out among pistols.

Smith & Wesson as a Company Today

Though revolvers have been – and will continue to be – the staple of the Smith & Wesson name, the company realizes that it needs to branch out. So now when you are looking for a handgun for sale, Smith & Wesson will also be able to provide more equipment produced from the same manufacturer to fulfill all of your handgun and accessory needs. Check out your favorite gun provider for not only some of the updated versions of classic S&W revolvers, but for many of their products to help amplify your next experience with your revolver.

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